Undergraduate Course Descriptions

 
The Courses and Programs of Study Catalog contains the most current course descriptions. It may contain extra supporting information.
11101/2-11201/2-11301/2: General Chemistry I, II, III
12200-12300: Honors General Chemistry I, II
20100-20200: Inorganic Chemistry I, II
21000: Environmental Chemistry
22000-22100-22200: Organic Chemistry I, II, III
23300: Intermediate Organic Chemistry: Biological Chemistry
22700: Advanced Organic/Inorganic Laboratory
23100-23200: Honors Organic Chemistry II, III
26100-26200-26300: Physical Chemistry I, II, III
26700: Experimental Physical Chemistry
26800: Computational Chemistry
29900: Advanced Research in Chemistry

Note: In chemistry laboratories, safety goggles must be worn at all times. Students who require prescriptive lenses may wear prescription glasses under goggles; contact lenses may not be worn. Medical exceptions must be obtained from the laboratory director.
 
Chemistry 11101/2-11201/2-11301/2: General Chemistry I, II, III
PQ: Good performance on the mathematics or calculus placement test. The first two courses in this sequence meet the general education requirement in the physical sciences. Variants A and B are equivalent in the first and second quarters but differ in focus in the third quarter as detailed below. Both three-quarter sequences cover atomic and molecular theories, chemical periodicity, chemical reactivity and bonding, chemical equilibria, acid-base equilibria, solubility equilibria, phase equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, kinetics, and nuclear chemistry. Examples are drawn from chemical, biological, and material systems. The laboratory portion includes an introduction to quantitative measurements, investigation of the properties of the important elements and their compounds, and experiments associated with the common ions and their separation and identification.
Offered Autumn, Winter, and Spring quarters, respectively.
 
Chemistry 11101-11201-11301. General Chemistry I, II, III (Variant A). (=ENST 11101-11201-11301)
PQ: Good performance on the mathematics or calculus placement test. The first two courses in this sequence meet the general education requirement in the physical sciences. Variant A is presented at the same level as Variant B, but the material in the third quarter is presented from a more synthetic perspective.
Autumn, Winter, Spring. L: M. Zhao, K. Y. Lee, Autumn; A. Dinner, Winter; Staff, Spring.
 
Chemistry 11102-11202-11302. General Chemistry I, II, III (Variant B).
PQ: Good performance on the mathematics or calculus placement test. The first two courses in this sequence meet the general education requirement in the physical sciences. Variant B is presented at the same level as Variant A, but the material in the third quarter is presented from a more physical perspective.
Autumn, Winter, Spring. L: M. Zhao, D. Mazziotti, Autumn; P. Guyot-Sionnest, Winter; L. Butler, Spring.
 
Chemistry 12100-12200-12300: General Chemistry I, II, III (Honors)
PQ: Good performance on the honors chemistry placement test or a score of 5 on the AP chemistry test. The first two courses in this sequence meet the general education requirement in the physical sciences. The subject matter and general program of this sequence is similar to that of General Chemistry listed previously. However, this accelerated course on the subject matter is designed for students deemed well prepared for a thorough and systematic study of chemistry. Introductory materials covered in the General Chemistry sequence is not part of the curriculum for this Honors sequence; instead, special topics are included in each quarter to provide an in- depth examination of various subjects of current interest in chemistry.
Autumn, Winter. L: M. Zhao, S. Sibener, Autumn; N. Scherer, Winter; Staff, Spring.
 
Chemistry 20100-20200. Inorganic Chemistry I, II
PQ for Chem 20100: Chem 11101/2-11201/2-11301/2 or 12100-12200-12300 and some knowledge of organic chemistry. PQ for Chem 20200: Chem 20100 and 22200. The extraordinarily diverse chemistry of the elements is organized in terms of molecular structure, electronic properties, and chemical reactivity. Chem 20100 concentrates on structure and bonding, solid state chemistry, and selected topics in the chemistry of the main group elements and coordination chemistry. Chem 20200 focuses on organometallic chemistry, reactions, synthesis, and catalysis, as well as bioinorganic chemistry.
G. Hillhouse, Winter; R. Jordan, Spring.
 
Chemistry 21000: Environmental Chemistry (ENST 23900, GEOS 23900)
PQ: Chem 11101/2 and 11201/2, and prior calculus course. The focus of this course is on the fundamental science underlying issues of local and regional scale pollution. In particular, lifetimes of important pollutants in the air, water, and soils are examined by considering the roles played by photochemistry, surface chemistry, biological processes, and dispersal into surrounding environment. Specific topics include urban air quality, water quality, long-lived organic toxins, heavy metals, and indoor air pollution. Control measures are also considered.
Generally offered Spring quarter.
 
Chemistry 22000-22100-22200: Organic Chemistry I, II, III
PQ: An average grade of C or higher in CHEM 11101-11201-11301 or equivalent, or consent of the department. (Students who receive a grade of B+ or higher in CHEM 22000 have the option of moving into honors organic chemistry for Winter/Spring. See following listing for CHEM 23100-23200.) NOTE: Most medical schools require a full academic year of organic chemistry.. The fundamental structures of organic molecules and the spectroscopic methods used to define them are studied. A comprehensive understanding of the reactions and properties of organic molecules (from kinetic, thermodynamic, and mechanistic viewpoints) is developed and applied to the synthesis of organic compounds and to an appreciation of nature’s important molecules. A lab is one afternoon a week in addition to scheduled class time each quarter.
Autumn, Winter, Spring. L: V. Keller. Autumn, Winter, Spring.
 
Chemistry 23000-23100-23200: Honors Organic Chemistry I, II, III
PQ: An average grade of B+ or higher in CHEM 11101-11201-11301 or equivalent, a 5 on the AP Chemistry exam, or consent of the instructor. Students who have taken CHEM 22000 or 22100 with an average grade of B+ or higher may petition the instructor to move into the Honors sequence. NOTE: Most medical schools require a full academic year of organic chemistry. The fundamental structures of organic molecules and the spectroscopic methods used to define them are studied. A comprehensive understanding of the reactions and properties of organic molecules (from kinetic, thermodynamic, and mechanistic viewpoints) is developed and applied to the synthesis of organic compounds and to an appreciation of nature’s important molecules. A lab is one afternoon a week in addition to scheduled class time each quarter.
Autumn, Winter, Spring. L: V. Keller. Autumn, Winter, Spring.
 
Chemistry 23300: Intermediate Organic Chemistry: Biological Chemistry
PQ: A grade of C or higher in CHEM 22200 or 23200, or consent of instructor. This course addresses the chemical foundations of the biosynthetic pathways for amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and natural products. We emphasize reaction mechanisms in the biosynthesis of these naturally occurring molecules.
Generally offered Autumn quarter.
 
Chemistry 22700: Advanced Organic/Inorganic Laboratory
PQ: Chem 20100 and 22300, or consent of instructor. Concurrent registration in Chem 20200 recommended. A project approach is combined with exposure to the more advanced techniques of organic and inorganic chemistry. Multistep synthesis, the synthesis of air-sensitive compounds, advanced chromatographic and spectroscopic characterization of products, and the handling of reactive intermediates are a part of the lab.
Generally offered Spring quarter.
 
Chemistry 26100-26200-26300: Physical Chemistry I, II, III
PQ: Chem 11301/2 or 12300, Math 20100, and Phys 13300. The application of physical and mathematical methods to the investigation of chemical systems is studied during this three-quarter sequence.
26100. Quantum Mechanics. This course presents quantum mechanics, the Schrödinger wave equation with exact and approximate methods of solution, angular momentum, and atomic spectra and structure. L. Butler. Autumn.
26200. Thermodynamics. This course continues the sequence with the study of thermodynamic principles and applications, as well as statistical mechanics. K. Y. Lee. Winter.
26300. Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics. This course is a discussion of chemical kinetics and dynamics for processes in gases, in liquids, and at interfaces. S. Sibener. Spring. Offered Autumn, Winter, and Spring quarters, respectively.
 
Chemistry 26700: Experimental Physical Chemistry
PQ: Chem 26100 and concurrent registration in 26200. This course introduces the principles and practice of physical chemical measurements. Techniques used in the design and construction of apparatus are discussed in lectures, and practice is provided through lab exercises and experiments. Subjects covered include vacuum techniques, electronics, optics, use of computers in lab instrumentation, materials of construction, and data analysis.
J. Norris. Winter.
 
Chemistry 26800: Computational Chemistry
PQ: CHEM 26100-26200, or PHYS 19700 and 23400. The theme for this course is the identification of scientific goals that computation can assist in achieving. The course is organized around the examination of exemplary problems, such as understanding the electronic structure and bonding in molecules and interpreting the structure and thermodynamic properties of liquids. The lectures deal with some aspects of numerical analysis and with the theoretical background relevant to calculations of the geometric and electronic structure of molecules, molecular mechanics, and molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. The lab consists of computational problems drawn from a broad range of chemical interests.
K. Freed. Spring.
 
Chemistry 29900: Advanced Research in Chemistry
PQ: Consent of a faculty sponsor and the undergraduate counselor. Open only to students majoring in chemistry who are eligible for honors. Available for either quality grades or for P/F grading. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Students conduct advanced, individually guided research. Students may submit a written report covering their research activities for consideration for departmental honors.
Offered all quarters.