Undergraduate Course Descriptions

 

 
The Courses and Programs of Study Catalog contains the most current course descriptions. It may contain extra supporting information.

 

10100-10200-11300: Introductory General Chemistry I-II; Comprehensive General Chemistry III.
11100-11200-11300: General Chemistry I, II, III
12100-12200-12300: Honors General Chemistry I-II-III
22000-22100-22200: Organic Chemistry I-II-III
23000-23100-23200: Honors Organic Chemistry I-II-III
23300: Organic Chemistry of Life Processes
20100-20200: Inorganic Chemistry I-II
26100-26200-26300: Quantum Mechanics; Thermodynamics; Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics
26700: Experimental Physical Chemistry
22700: Advanced Organic/Inorganic Laboratory
26800: Computational Chemistry and Biology.
29900: Advanced Research in Chemistry. 100 units.
29600: Research in Chemistry. 000 Units.
00111-00112-00113. Collaborative Learning in General Chemistry I-II-III.
00220-00221-00222: Collaborative Learning in Organic Chemistry I-II-III.

 

Note: In chemistry laboratories, safety goggles must be worn at all times. Students who require prescriptive lenses may wear prescription glasses under goggles; contact lenses may not be worn. Medical exceptions must be obtained from the laboratory director.
 
Chemistry 10100-10200-11300: Introductory General Chemistry I-II; Comprehensive General Chemistry III.
This three-quarter sequence is a systematic introduction to chemistry for beginning students in chemistry or for those whose exposure to the subject has been moderate. We cover atomic and molecular theories, chemical periodicity, chemical reactivity and bonding, chemical equilibria, acid-base equilibria, solubility equilibria, phase equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, kinetics, quantum mechanics, and nuclear chemistry. Examples are drawn from chemical, biological, and materials systems. The laboratory portion includes an introduction to quantitative measurements, investigation of the properties of the important elements and their compounds, and experiments associated with the common ions and their separation and identification. Apart from one discussion session per week and a laboratory component, special emphasis on scientific problem-solving skills is made through two additional structured learning sessions per week devoted to quantitative reasoning. Attendance at discussion, structured learning, and laboratory sessions is mandatory. FOR THE THIRD (SPRING) QUARTER OF THE SEQUENCE, STUDENTS WILL ENROLL IN CHEM 11300.
 
 
Chemistry 11100-11200-11300: General Chemistry I, II, III
Enrollment by placement only. These courses meet the general education requirement in the physical sciences. This three-quarter sequence is a comprehensive survey of modern descriptive, inorganic, and physical chemistry for students with a good secondary school exposure to general chemistry. We cover atomic and molecular theories, chemical periodicity, chemical reactivity and bonding, chemical equilibria, acid-base equilibria, solubility equilibria, phase equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, kinetics, quantum mechanics, and nuclear chemistry. Examples are drawn from chemical, biological, and materials systems. The laboratory portion includes an introduction to quantitative measurements, investigation of the properties of the important elements and their compounds, and experiments associated with the common ions and their separation and identification. Attendance at one discussion session per week and laboratory sessions is required.
Offered Autumn, Winter, and Spring quarters, respectively.
 
 
Chemistry 12100-12200-12300: Honors General Chemistry I-II-III
Enrollment by placement only. The first two courses in this sequence meet the general education requirement in the physical sciences. The subject matter and general program of this sequence is similar to that of the Comprehensive General Chemistry sequence. However, this accelerated course on the subject matter is designed for students deemed well prepared for a thorough and systematic study of chemistry. Introductory materials covered in the Comprehensive General Chemistry sequence are not part of the curriculum for this sequence; instead, special topics are included in each quarter to provide an in-depth examination of various subjects of current interest in chemistry. Attendance at one discussion session per week and laboratory sessions is required.
Offered Autumn, Winter, and Spring quarters, respectively.
 
 
Chemistry 22000-22100-22200: Organic Chemistry I-II-III.
The fundamental structures of organic molecules and the spectroscopic methods used to define them are studied. A comprehensive understanding of the reactions and properties of organic molecules (from kinetic, thermodynamic, and mechanistic viewpoints) is developed and applied to the synthesis of organic compounds and to an appreciation of nature’s important molecules.
 
 
Chemistry 23000-23100-23200: Honors Organic Chemistry I-II-III.
This course studies the fundamental structures of organic molecules and the spectroscopic methods used to define. A comprehensive understanding of the reactions and properties of organic molecules (from kinetic, thermodynamic, and mechanistic viewpoints) is developed and applied to the synthesis of organic compounds and to an appreciation of nature’s important molecules.
 
 
Chemistry 23300: Organic Chemistry of Life Processes. 100 Units.
This course addresses the chemical foundations of the biosynthetic pathways for amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and natural products. We emphasize reaction mechanisms in the biosynthesis of these naturally occurring molecules.
 
 
Chemistry 20100-20200: Inorganic Chemistry I-II.
The extraordinarily diverse chemistry of the elements is organized in terms of molecular structure, electronic properties, and chemical reactivity. CHEM 20100 concentrates on structure and bonding, solid state chemistry, and selected topics in the chemistry of the main group elements and coordination chemistry. CHEM 20200 focuses on organometallic chemistry, reactions, synthesis, and catalysis, as well as bioinorganic chemistry.
Offered Autumn, Winter, and Spring quarters, respectively.
 
 
Chemistry 26100-26200-26300: Quantum Mechanics; Thermodynamics; Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics.
This three-quarter sequence studies the application of physical and mathematical methods to the investigation of chemical systems.
 
 
Chemistry 26700: Experimental Physical Chemistry. 100 Units.
This course introduces the principles and practice of physical chemical measurements. Techniques used in the design and construction of apparatus are discussed in lectures, and practice is provided through lab exercises and experiments. Subjects covered include vacuum techniques, electronics, optics, use of computers in lab instrumentation, materials of construction, and data analysis.
 
 
Chemistry 22700: Advanced Organic/Inorganic Laboratory. 100 Units.
This course combines a project approach with exposure to the more advanced techniques of organic and inorganic chemistry. Multistep synthesis, the synthesis of air-sensitive compounds, advanced chromatographic and spectroscopic characterization of products, and the handling of reactive intermediates are a part of the lab.
 
 
Chemistry 26800: Computational Chemistry and Biology. 100 Units.
The theme for this course is the identification of scientific goals that computation can assist in achieving. We examine problems such as understanding the electronic structure and bonding in molecules, interpreting the structure and thermodynamic properties of liquids, protein folding, enzyme catalysis, and bioinformatics. The lectures deal with aspects of numerical analysis and with the theoretical background relevant to calculations of the geometric and electronic structure of molecules, molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo simulations. The lab consists of computational problems drawn from a broad range of chemical and biological interests.
 
 
Chemistry 29900: Advanced Research in Chemistry. 100 units.
Consent of a faculty sponsor and the undergraduate counselor. Open only to students majoring in chemistry who are eligible for honors. Available for either quality grades or for P/F grading. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Students conduct advanced, individually guided research. Students may submit a written report covering their research activities for consideration for departmental honors.
 
 
Chemistry 29600: Research in Chemistry. 000 Units.
Students conduct advanced, individually-guided research. Students must submit a written report covering their research activities to the undergraduate counselor. Because this is a 000 credit course, it may be taken as a fifth course without additional charge.
 
 
Chemistry 00111-00112-00113: Collaborative Learning in General Chemistry I-II-III.
This is an optional, limited enrollment workshop for students concurrently enrolled in CHEM 11100-11200-11300 Comprehensive General Chemistry I-II-III. Undergraduate Team Leaders guide small groups of students in weekly workshops. The workshops focus on the analysis of problem sets designed to augment and complement the Comprehensive General Chemistry material. Instead of tutoring or lecturing, Team Leaders coach students as they work collaboratively in small groups on the assigned problems by referencing class lectures and assigned reading materials. The workshops do not repeat but extend the substantive discussions and lectures of the Comprehensive General Chemistry course. Additionally, these workshops aim to develop communication skills, cooperative attitudes, and promote a teamwork environment. Because the benefits of collaborative learning can only be gained through consistent effort and attendance, this zero-credit course is graded P/F based on the student’s level of participation and attendance.
 
 
Chemistry 00220-00221-00222: Collaborative Learning in Organic Chemistry I-II-III.
This is an optional, limited enrollment workshop for students concurrently enrolled in CHEM 22000-22100-22200 Organic Chemistry I-II-III. Undergraduate Team Leaders guide small groups of students in weekly workshops. The workshops focus on the analysis of problem sets designed to augment and complement the Organic Chemistry material. Instead of tutoring or lecturing, Team Leaders coach students as they work collaboratively in small groups on the assigned problems by referencing class lectures and assigned reading materials. The workshops do not repeat but extend the substantive discussions and lectures of the Organic Chemistry course. Additionally, these workshops aim to develop communication skills, cooperative attitudes, and promote a teamwork environment. Because the benefits of collaborative learning can only be gained through consistent effort and attendance, this zero-credit course is graded P/F based on the student’s level of participation and attendance.